Chris.Columbus1492 Pictures and South Korea-based CJ Entertainment unveiled their first slate this morning since signing a three-year development deal late last year to create family-friendly films with global appeal. 1492 partners Chris Columbus, Michael Barnathan and Mark Radcliffe pick the projects, and CJ funds development and will co-finance production with studio partners.

They start out with three thrillers.

* Killer Pizza is a comedy about a 14-year old who lands a summer job at a pizza joint which serves pies like The Monstrosity and The Frankensausage, but is actually a front for a monster-hunting organization. Adam Green is adapting the Greg Taylor novel and Rafaella de Laurentiis will also produce.

* Carpe Demon is an adaptation of the Julie Kenner novel Carpe Demon: Adventures of a Demon-Hunting Soccer Mom. Columbus will rewrite the story of a stay-at-home mother charged with cleaning up her demon-plagued small town.

* The Graveyard Book is an adaptation of the book by Coraline‘s Neil Gaiman. Neil Jordan will write and direct the live-action film about an orphan raised by ghosts. Wayfare Entertaiment, Framestore and Gaiman will also produce, and CJ will co-finance the film and distribute in Korea and Japan.

ATNN
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4 years
I cannot wait for Carpe Demon. The book was great...actually the whole series is great. Looking forward...
Stacey
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4 years
I can definitely see R. Lee Ermey as Eddy in Carpe Demon! Can't wait to see it!
Tiffany
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4 years
These seem like some really interesting works.

“The projects we are developing together meet our shared goal of producing movies for the global audience,” Columbus said. “We see this as just the beginning of many terrific movies together.”

CJ, a powerhouse in Asia and one of the original investors of DreamWorks, made 1492 its first Hollywood talent pact for CJ Group vice chairman Miky Lee and CJ Entertainment CEO Katharine Kim. Columbus and company have a separate alliance with Reliance Big Entertainment, one of about a dozen deals that CAA brokered for top clients with production companies. It is all part of the trend where producers are looking offshore for development money as studios halted overall producing deals.